Chevron Holographic Mani

Ever since I finished my last manicure, I’ve been eyeing my bottle of Meet Me at the Disco from Sephora by OPI.  Technically the bottle says it’s a top coat, but I wanted to slather it all over my nails because of its beautiful holo glitter.

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Silvery holographic goodness from Meet Me At the Disco by Sephora by OPI.

Because Meet Me At the Disco is supposed to be a top coat, the density of glitter in the polish is a little on the thin side in order to let a base color show through.  In order to not have 10 layers of polish on my nails, I applied it with a makeup sponge so that the excess fluid would get absorbed by the sponge.  Pretty crafty, eh?  Glitter can get chunky in places with that kind of application, so I did end up brushing on an extra two coats of polish straight from the bottle to even out the texture.

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Obligatory out of focus picture to photograph the holographic effect. It’s hard to take pictures of holo polish!

For an accent nail, I stamped a chevron pattern onto my ring finger with Konad Special Nail Polish in Flash Black and plate BM-423 from Bundle Monster.

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Easy chevron nail art accomplished!

Hope you’re having a great summer so far!  Happy polishing!

 

 

Coral and White Striped Mani

Welcome to the hot days of summer!  One of my favorite warm weather color combos is coral and white, so I wanted to do a fun little manicure with that palette.

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Polishes used from left to right: Sweet Daisy by Nicole by OPI, Born Pretty Stamping Nail Polish in #4 and #8, Planks A Lot from OPI, and Meet Me At the Disco by Sephora by OPI.

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I began by painting all my nails with Sweet Daisy.

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Using plate Qgirl-046 from Ya Qin An and white stamping polish, I applied the striped pattern pictured on the right side of the plate to my nails. For the horizontal stripes, I only used the bottom half of the striped pattern and tilted my stamper accordingly.

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I did some reverse stamping using the flowers from Qgirl-046 and some purple polishes. To make it look more sparkly, I applied Meet Me At the Disco to the image first before coloring it in with lavender polish.

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I stamped the flowers directly onto my nails, and after applying Seche Vite top coat, I applied a drop of Kiss Nail Art Glue and added a rhinestone to the center of each flower.

It’s a very simple manicure, but it screams summertime!  If you don’t have the plate, you can opt to handpaint the lines with a striping brush or use some striping tape.  I’m sure the results will look just as fabulous.

Happy polishing!

Nail Art Problem #4 and Review of Polish Mixing Balls

If you’re like me and have a large nail polish collection, you’ll inevitably have several bottles of polish that you haven’t used in such a long time that the color has separated from the formula.  Some people think that at this point, you have to throw out the bottle, although sometimes you can fix the problem by shaking the bottle for minutes on end.  But what if I told you that there is a product you can buy that will save you the hassle of all that?

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Stainless steel mixing balls to the rescue!

I fondly remember my mom shaking a bottle of nail polish in preparation to do her nails and hearing the metal balls inside the container go clickety-clack against the glass.  Some polishes come with these mixing beads already, but not every bottle has them, and therein lies the problem of getting the formula back to normal again once the polish separates.

These little ball bearings are such a time saver because adding one ball to a bottle will mix the polish to its original consistency within a minute, and they are cheap, too.  You can find the link for the product at the end of this post, but $2.90 will get you 20 of these balls.

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They arrive in a little zip-sealed bag from the merchant.

The balls are fairly small.  The website claims that they are 5 mm, but they are more like 4 mm in diameter.  They do have some weight to them so that they can cut through viscous nail polish easily.  It should be noted that they aren’t perfectly round and have scratches on them and have more of a multi-faceted surface, but they perform the job they need to do just fine.

Glitter polishes tend to settle and separate more than other ones because of the weight of the glitter being heavier than the polish formula, so it wasn’t hard to find a bottle that needed mixing.  I tested the blending capabilities out by putting a ball into Meet Me At the Disco by Sephora by OPI below.

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Left: Separated polish before mixing. I actually shook the bottle a little before taking the photo to listen if there was a ball inside already from the manufacturer (there wasn’t), but you can see that the polish is still pretty separated. Right: After adding one mixing ball to the bottle and shaking it for less than a minute, the polish looks evenly blended.

I also had a bottle of crackle polish from Sally Hansen in Antiqued Gold from when it first became popular years ago.  I thought this bottle would definitely have to be tossed- the pigment would hardly move even when the bottle was inverted, and I had tried to shake it back to normal before without any luck.  But lo and behold, I added just one of the mixing beads to the bottle, shook it for under a minute, and everything returned to normal!

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Behold, the magic of ball bearings! The top photos are what the polish looked like originally, and the bottom photos look like I bought a brand new bottle from the store, but all I did was shake the bottle after the addition of a single bead. If you’re wondering about the difference in the caps, I couldn’t open the bottle because the crackle design was shrink wrapped around the handle so that the plastic overlay would turn instead of opening the bottle, so I cut the film off.

I wasn’t so sure that the formula would be any good even after mixing it, but it still crackles after all these years!  Score!

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Close up view of my nail with the freshly reinvigorated bottle of Antiqued Gold crackle polish by Sally Hansen.

I’m not into creating my own polish colors, but adding a ball to a bottle of clear coat and adding different kinds/concentrations of glitter to it would make for a fun DIY project.

Also, if your polish has become too thick, you can add a few drops of nail polish thinner to it along with a bead and kick the formula back into usable condition again.

It’s safe to say that I highly recommend these little metal balls.  I never thought I would get such joy from such a little purchase!  I would add one or two to all of my bottles of polish, but I would need a few hundred more!  They are definitely worth the price, so why not buy a pack and try them out?

Diamond rating: ♦♦♦♦♦ (5/5)

If you are interested in purchasing these stainless steel polish mixing balls (retail price is $2.90 USD for 20), the link for the item is shown below.  Using code RSSPX31 will get you 10% off your order, and Born Pretty Store offers free worldwide shipping.  Happy polishing!

http://www.bornprettystore.com/20pcs100pcs-nail-polish-mixing-balls-stainless-steel-beads-glitter-polish-p-15225.html

http://www.bornprettystore.com/

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